Werk is moeilijk te krijgen

Beebmeep

Well-Known Member
Vreemd... Ik ben ook geen lid, maar kon het wel lezen! Maar nu ook niet meer....
Had ik gisteren ook, maar door te googlen toch het volledige artikel (dat ik in de Adelaide Advertiser had zien staan) kunnen lezen/delen.

OK, 'stuff copyright':


IT’S not Gen Y, it’s Gen Why. Why are they such job snobs? Why do they seem to think they’re better than everyone else? And why do they think trade apprenticeships are beneath them?

Youth unemployment is at a decade-high 14 per cent — and up to 30 per cent in some areas — and yet employers can’t get young people to answer their job ads.

Jobs that a generation ago would have been eagerly snapped up are now seen as not good enough for this generation.


How else to explain the fact that Victorian butcher chain Tasman Meats, with 50 apprenticeships on offer, has had virtually no response? The company contacted me last week to say they’ve been advertising extensively but have had only two takers. That’s two applicants for 50 jobs.

As apprenticeships go, they are pretty good positions. The pay is $18 an hour — 20 per cent more than the award — and there is extra training in food preparation and cooking skills. Tasman Meats is a growing business and there’s lots of scope for promotion and managerial roles.

In this MasterChef era of renewed interest in cooking, food production and whole foods, you’d think there would be considerable interest. But no. They’re not even getting the clicks on seek.com.

I asked a few of my Gen Y friends and relatives about it and they just about snorted in my face.

They made it clear butchery is beneath them. They don’t want to get dirty, bloody or cold.

They don’t want to look ugly in the uniforms, they don’t want to touch raw meat and they don’t want to have to break down an entire animal.

Such an attitude is fine for those who are in a position to pick and choose. But it’s not good enough that some people would prefer to be on unemployment benefits rather than work.

It seems that if a position does not involve hi-tech gadgets, reality TV or a glamorous service industry role, they’re simply not interested.

As Tasman Meats CEO Matt Swindells sees it, “not everyone needs to be a barista or a computer programmer”. He added: “Some skills such as cooking and food preparation provide employment for life no matter what the career.”

Things have changed since the 1950s, when people were glad to have an ongoing stable job that offered some sort of career path.

Now a job must be fun, funky, flexible and high-paid before young people will even give it a go.

They’re over-qualified and undermotivated to take a range of trade and technical jobs that need to be filled. Indeed, the latest data from the federal Department of Employment shows there is a desperate shortage of sheet metal workers, motor mechanics, metal fabricators, panel beaters, roof plumbers, stone masons, glaziers, plasterers, bakers and butchers in Victoria.

It’s a myth that youth wages are too high, pricing young people out of the labour market. The fact is that youth unemployment rates have been rising even though youth wages have been falling relative to adult wages.

What seems to be more pressing is that the cost involved in training and supervising young people isn’t worth it, particularly for small businesses.

Employers say young people are often their own worst enemies.

“Too expensive and too much aggro,” says one.

“Aiming too high,” says another.

“Poor attitude and questionable commitment,” says another.

It certainly seems that there is a growing divide in the labour market. On one hand there is a big group of well-educated young people who are motivated, well presented and keen to do what it takes to please their employer.

Nothing is too much trouble: working overtime, changing shifts, working around the clock and around the week, and going that extra mile to learn new skills.

Having a stable job is no longer a priority for young people.
NOT surprisingly, such people are snapping up all of the desirable jobs and creating their own positions as well. They’re well paid, have lots of control and creative input and lots of flexibility.

Then there is another group that has the same goals and expectations, but don’t have the skills or work ethic to make it happen. They want a job in their field of study with a clear career path, pays well from day one, is flexible, creative and rewarding.

But they don’t want to start from the bottom, get dirty, work outside their field of study, or do anything that’s not a “passion” for them.

Some have a sense of entitlement so great that they think employers are lucky to have them. They don’t care about impressing at an interview. They don’t turn up on time or dress well. They don’t care if their ability and attitude don’t cut it and they don’t want work to cut into their precious leisure time.

Some won’t even turn off their mobile phones during job interviews.

And they would be happy to win MasterChef so they can be a celebrity chef, but they wouldn’t becoming a butcher.

It’s no wonder employers are calling them Generation Why Bother.

Susie O’Brien is a Herald Sun columnist

Facebook.com/NewswithSuse and blog susieobrien.com.au

susan.obrien@news.com.au

Originally published as ‘Gen Why’ has a job snob problem


 

Janneke61

Well-Known Member
Vreemd... Ik ben ook geen lid, maar kon het wel lezen! Maar nu ook niet meer....
Had ik gisteren ook, maar door te googlen toch het volledige artikel (dat ik in de Adelaide Advertiser had zien staan) kunnen lezen/delen.

OK, 'stuff copyright':


IT’S not Gen Y, it’s Gen Why. Why are they such job snobs? Why do they seem to think they’re better than everyone else? And why do they think trade apprenticeships are beneath them?

Youth unemployment is at a decade-high 14 per cent — and up to 30 per cent in some areas — and yet employers can’t get young people to answer their job ads.

Jobs that a generation ago would have been eagerly snapped up are now seen as not good enough for this generation.


How else to explain the fact that Victorian butcher chain Tasman Meats, with 50 apprenticeships on offer, has had virtually no response? The company contacted me last week to say they’ve been advertising extensively but have had only two takers. That’s two applicants for 50 jobs.

As apprenticeships go, they are pretty good positions. The pay is $18 an hour — 20 per cent more than the award — and there is extra training in food preparation and cooking skills. Tasman Meats is a growing business and there’s lots of scope for promotion and managerial roles.

In this MasterChef era of renewed interest in cooking, food production and whole foods, you’d think there would be considerable interest. But no. They’re not even getting the clicks on seek.com.

I asked a few of my Gen Y friends and relatives about it and they just about snorted in my face.

They made it clear butchery is beneath them. They don’t want to get dirty, bloody or cold.

They don’t want to look ugly in the uniforms, they don’t want to touch raw meat and they don’t want to have to break down an entire animal.

Such an attitude is fine for those who are in a position to pick and choose. But it’s not good enough that some people would prefer to be on unemployment benefits rather than work.

It seems that if a position does not involve hi-tech gadgets, reality TV or a glamorous service industry role, they’re simply not interested.

As Tasman Meats CEO Matt Swindells sees it, “not everyone needs to be a barista or a computer programmer”. He added: “Some skills such as cooking and food preparation provide employment for life no matter what the career.”

Things have changed since the 1950s, when people were glad to have an ongoing stable job that offered some sort of career path.

Now a job must be fun, funky, flexible and high-paid before young people will even give it a go.

They’re over-qualified and undermotivated to take a range of trade and technical jobs that need to be filled. Indeed, the latest data from the federal Department of Employment shows there is a desperate shortage of sheet metal workers, motor mechanics, metal fabricators, panel beaters, roof plumbers, stone masons, glaziers, plasterers, bakers and butchers in Victoria.

It’s a myth that youth wages are too high, pricing young people out of the labour market. The fact is that youth unemployment rates have been rising even though youth wages have been falling relative to adult wages.

What seems to be more pressing is that the cost involved in training and supervising young people isn’t worth it, particularly for small businesses.

Employers say young people are often their own worst enemies.

“Too expensive and too much aggro,” says one.

“Aiming too high,” says another.

“Poor attitude and questionable commitment,” says another.

It certainly seems that there is a growing divide in the labour market. On one hand there is a big group of well-educated young people who are motivated, well presented and keen to do what it takes to please their employer.

Nothing is too much trouble: working overtime, changing shifts, working around the clock and around the week, and going that extra mile to learn new skills.

Having a stable job is no longer a priority for young people.
NOT surprisingly, such people are snapping up all of the desirable jobs and creating their own positions as well. They’re well paid, have lots of control and creative input and lots of flexibility.

Then there is another group that has the same goals and expectations, but don’t have the skills or work ethic to make it happen. They want a job in their field of study with a clear career path, pays well from day one, is flexible, creative and rewarding.

But they don’t want to start from the bottom, get dirty, work outside their field of study, or do anything that’s not a “passion” for them.

Some have a sense of entitlement so great that they think employers are lucky to have them. They don’t care about impressing at an interview. They don’t turn up on time or dress well. They don’t care if their ability and attitude don’t cut it and they don’t want work to cut into their precious leisure time.

Some won’t even turn off their mobile phones during job interviews.

And they would be happy to win MasterChef so they can be a celebrity chef, but they wouldn’t becoming a butcher.

It’s no wonder employers are calling them Generation Why Bother.

Susie O’Brien is a Herald Sun columnist

Facebook.com/NewswithSuse and blog susieobrien.com.au

susan.obrien@news.com.au

Originally published as ‘Gen Why’ has a job snob problem

Bedankt voor het delen; ik kon het ook niet openen. Het bevestigt wel de indruk die ik al had. Ik vraag me trouwens af hoe het in NL is op dit moment. Is het vergelijkbaar? Het zal me niets verbazen.
 
Voor zover ik weet zitten de werkgevers in Nederland nog steeds in een luxepositie, het komt regelmatig voor dat er 100 tot 200 sollicitanten zijn voor een openstaande functie, daardoor worden er belachelijke eisen gesteld, veel afgestudeerden hebben het dan ook nog steeds moeilijk om een baan te vinden. Maar het trekt zo langzamerhand wel aan, mensen hebben weer meer vertrouwen in de economie wat inhoudt dat er straks hopelijk meer banen met minder belachelijke eisen zijn.
 

Ems81

XPdite Sponsor
Banen in welke sector? @Ems81
Van alles. ik werk zelf ik research voor de government (water beheer) maar er is een tekort aan zowat alles... De mensen komen en gaan continu. bv politie agenten. hier krijgje al 70k per jaar voor je training (1e jaar). Government heeft interessante banen. Doctors and nurses. chefs... teachers. ik heb zelfs een jaar bij het benzine station gewerkt voor $34 per uur... casual baantjes zat terwijl je zoekt naar een 'echte' baan. Ja, wel remote maar prachtige natuur, alles heel relaxed en hoge lonen (al is cost of living ook hoger).
 

Katjavdl

XPdite Sponsor
Van alles. ik werk zelf ik research voor de government (water beheer) maar er is een tekort aan zowat alles... De mensen komen en gaan continu. bv politie agenten. hier krijgje al 70k per jaar voor je training (1e jaar). Government heeft interessante banen. Doctors and nurses. chefs... teachers. ik heb zelfs een jaar bij het benzine station gewerkt voor $34 per uur... casual baantjes zat terwijl je zoekt naar een 'echte' baan. Ja, wel remote maar prachtige natuur, alles heel relaxed en hoge lonen (al is cost of living ook hoger).
hihi dat ga ik eens even voorleggen....kijken wat de reactie is.....van de chef ;)
 

Beebmeep

Well-Known Member
Het punt is 'remote'. Velen willen dat niet. Zowel Aussies zelf als migranten.
Als ik kijk naar Whyalla (SA), toch echt geen gat, dan hebben ze het in Adelaide over de 'bush'. Wij noemen het 'country' :D
Maar hier willen veel mensen al niet heen. Als ze toch moeten, dan zijn er die op en neer pendelen: in het weekend zijn ze thuis in Adelaide, doordeweeks zitten ze hier. En inderdaad leraren, councilmedewerkers, politie-agenten etc. die hier twee jaar zitten om 'remote' ervaring op te doen en daarna gewoon weer naar Adelaide gaan.

Ik begrijp heel goed dat remote niet voor iedereen is weggelegd. Ondanks dat de meeste faciliteiten er zijn, kun je je toch erg geisoleerd voelen en voor studie kom je of uit op afstandsonderwijs of de kinderen moeten tzt op kamers in de grote stad, wat financieel ook niet voor iedereens is weggelegd.

En remote heeft ook nog weleens een slechte reputatie. Ziekenhuizen daar zijn vast niet goed, veel alcohol- en drugsmisbruik, scholen zijn vast niet zo goed als in de stad, etc. Nou, ik woon nu 6 jaar in de 'country', maar behalve dat ik soms zou willen dat ik wat dichterbij Adelaide woonde, zodat ik mijn vrienden daar wat vaker kon zien (alleen @Lamarck vindt het leuk deze kant op te komen :D ) en wat vaker naar het theater of een van de festivals oid zou gaan, bevalt het me hier na een moeilijk 1e jaar prima.

En het was dat de functie al gevuld was, maar anders had ik destijds vanuit Adelaide op een voltijdse functie in Alice Springs gesolliciteerd. Slim? Geen idee, maar ik kan jullie zeggen, dat als het wel zo had mogen zijn, ik toch echt naar The Alice verhuisd was. Of ik het volgehouden had, is een ander verhaal :D
 

Ems81

XPdite Sponsor
Het punt is 'remote'. Velen willen dat niet. Zowel Aussies zelf als migranten.
Als ik kijk naar Whyalla (SA), toch echt geen gat, dan hebben ze het in Adelaide over de 'bush'. Wij noemen het 'country' :D
Maar hier willen veel mensen al niet heen. Als ze toch moeten, dan zijn er die op en neer pendelen: in het weekend zijn ze thuis in Adelaide, doordeweeks zitten ze hier. En inderdaad leraren, councilmedewerkers, politie-agenten etc. die hier twee jaar zitten om 'remote' ervaring op te doen en daarna gewoon weer naar Adelaide gaan.

Ik begrijp heel goed dat remote niet voor iedereen is weggelegd. Ondanks dat de meeste faciliteiten er zijn, kun je je toch erg geisoleerd voelen en voor studie kom je of uit op afstandsonderwijs of de kinderen moeten tzt op kamers in de grote stad, wat financieel ook niet voor iedereens is weggelegd.

En remote heeft ook nog weleens een slechte reputatie. Ziekenhuizen daar zijn vast niet goed, veel alcohol- en drugsmisbruik, scholen zijn vast niet zo goed als in de stad, etc. Nou, ik woon nu 6 jaar in de 'country', maar behalve dat ik soms zou willen dat ik wat dichterbij Adelaide woonde, zodat ik mijn vrienden daar wat vaker kon zien (alleen @Lamarck vindt het leuk deze kant op te komen :D ) en wat vaker naar het theater of een van de festivals oid zou gaan, bevalt het me hier na een moeilijk 1e jaar prima.

En het was dat de functie al gevuld was, maar anders had ik destijds vanuit Adelaide op een voltijdse functie in Alice Springs gesolliciteerd. Slim? Geen idee, maar ik kan jullie zeggen, dat als het wel zo had mogen zijn, ik toch echt naar The Alice verhuisd was. Of ik het volgehouden had, is een ander verhaal :D
Alice is echt heel leuk hoor. zoveel te doen.. cultuur, veel verschillende sportverenigingen (zelfs 'circus'). muziek festivals.. noem maar op. 100x beter dan Adelaide... dat vind ik zo'n saaie stad;-)

ik denk dat de mentaliteit hier is: we zitten allemaal in hetzelfde schuitje, laten we er het beste van maken. Ik woonde eerst in Brisbane maar ik kon daar in 2 jaar geen baan vinden.. naar de Territory gegaan voor de banen en voila!!! Had er ook eerst helemaal geen zin in... maar nu LOVE IT!!!
 

Kims

Well-Known Member
Alice is echt heel leuk hoor. zoveel te doen.. cultuur, veel verschillende sportverenigingen (zelfs 'circus'). muziek festivals.. noem maar op. 100x beter dan Adelaide... dat vind ik zo'n saaie stad;-)

ik denk dat de mentaliteit hier is: we zitten allemaal in hetzelfde schuitje, laten we er het beste van maken. Ik woonde eerst in Brisbane maar ik kon daar in 2 jaar geen baan vinden.. naar de Territory gegaan voor de banen en voila!!! Had er ook eerst helemaal geen zin in... maar nu LOVE IT!!!
Precies mijn ervaring met "afgelegen" plekken zoals Alice, Christmas Island, Darwin etc. en nu Broome. Erg open op het sociale vlak want veel mensen zijn geen "locals" dus zit je inderdaad allemaal in hetzelfde bootje.

En het (tropische) Noorden blijft bijzonder, spectaculaire natuur, veel ruimte en inderdaad meer mogelijkheden qua werk voor specifieke beroepen/werk, betere salarissen etc. Wel een "higher cost of living" maar dat weegt voor mij niet op tegen alle (financiele) voordelen.

Maar het blijft een zeer persoonlijke keuze. Ik zou niet meer in een stad willen wonen...
 
Last edited:

M5

Moderator
Denk dat remote wonen leuk is for een bepaalde periode (1 of 2 jaar) en je veel kan bieden in vorm van vrijheis, nature en je vaak ver boven modaal kan verdienen in die area's en op die manier goede ervaring op kan doen en veel geld kan verdienen in een relatief kort tijds bestek.
Ben je alleen of met zijn tweeen kun je een hoop aan in een remote environment, maar het word al een stuk moeilijker en beperkter met kinderen en dan zijn en zijn bepaalde resources die je je kinderen wil aanbieden (healthcare, education, ontwikkeling enz) beperkt, maar goed dat is onze ervaring en mijn mening.
 

Ems81

XPdite Sponsor
Denk dat remote wonen leuk is for een bepaalde periode (1 of 2 jaar) en je veel kan bieden in vorm van vrijheis, nature en je vaak ver boven modaal kan verdienen in die area's en op die manier goede ervaring op kan doen en veel geld kan verdienen in een relatief kort tijds bestek.
Ben je alleen of met zijn tweeen kun je een hoop aan in een remote environment, maar het word al een stuk moeilijker en beperkter met kinderen en dan zijn en zijn bepaalde resources die je je kinderen wil aanbieden (healthcare, education, ontwikkeling enz) beperkt, maar goed dat is onze ervaring en mijn mening.
hangt er vanaf hoe 'remote'. Ik zou ook niet in een community hier in a NT willen wonen, maar Alice, Katherine en Darwin hebben prima voorzieningen qua ziekenhuizen en scholen..
 

Gwen

XPdite Sponsor
Ik zal snel even een update in mijn eigen lastavaza zetten maar om nog even wat goed nieuws op het forum te gooien: Ik heb een baan! Een echte social work baan :p:D. Als het goed is start ik komende week. Morgen krijg ik mijn 'offer' van het bedrijf. Gaat via een recruitment agency, maar ga wel bij het bedrijf zelf in dienst. De eerste functie waar ik op gesolliciteerd had :eek:. Ik was van plan om vanaf eind Okt in de graanoogst te gaan werken en had deze baan al secured, maar toen ik mijn casual baantje bij Harvey Norman verloor omdat ze geen casuals meer in mochten zetten van het hoofdkantoor had ik niet meer genoeg geld om tot eind Okt uit te zingen. Net nieuwe auto gekocht enzo.. Dus toen dacht ik 'het lijkt me sterk dat het universum mijn casual job afneemt om een andere tijdelijke casual job te vinden tot eind Okt, dus ik zal maar eens naar fulltime social work posities gaan kijken'. Mijn cv doorgestuurd naar de Sugarman Group, zij hebben mijn cv doorgestuurd naar mijn nieuwe werkgever, na 2 weken op gesprek en halve week later het goede nieuws. Kan het nog niet helemaal bevatten! Ben erg benieuwd naar de offer morgen. Ik ga uit van een startsalaris van 65.000 per jaar. Dit betekend dat ik over een maandje ongeveer ook eindelijk mijn eigen huisje kan gaan huren!!!
Met dank aan mijn ontzettend goede vrienden, waar ik nu een tijdje mag logeren. Bijzondere vriendschappen worden opgebouwd via Xpdite.
 

IDS

Member
Super Gwen! Ben benieuwd wat je precies gaat doen als social worker.
Veel succes in ieder geval.
 

Katjavdl

XPdite Sponsor
Top @Gwen eindelijk weer eens goed nieuws op het banenfront.
Kijk wat betreft remote, dat heeft ons altijd al getrokken. Wij hebben geen kinderen, dus dat scheelt (is onze mening). Ik ben me er terdege van bewust, dat als je dat gaat doen, dat het echt wel eens kan tegenvallen. Maar daar wordt je dan weer sterker van.
Wat betreft de kosten....is het echt duurder dan Sydney? Ik dacht dat we hier in de grote stad toch wel aan de top zaten wat dat betreft...
 

Kims

Well-Known Member
Wat betreft de kosten....is het echt duurder dan Sydney? Ik dacht dat we hier in de grote stad toch wel aan de top zaten wat dat betreft...
Huren zijn ook erg hoog in sommige plekken (Darwin, Broome etc) en daarnaast zijn boodschappen en andere levenskosten (electriciteit, auto's, onderhoud etc.) bijvoorbeeld een stuk duurder dan in steden. Daar staat dan wel tegenover dat je vaak financiele compensatie krijgt via je werk/belasting etc.
 

Ems81

XPdite Sponsor
Top @Gwen eindelijk weer eens goed nieuws op het banenfront.
Kijk wat betreft remote, dat heeft ons altijd al getrokken. Wij hebben geen kinderen, dus dat scheelt (is onze mening). Ik ben me er terdege van bewust, dat als je dat gaat doen, dat het echt wel eens kan tegenvallen. Maar daar wordt je dan weer sterker van.
Wat betreft de kosten....is het echt duurder dan Sydney? Ik dacht dat we hier in de grote stad toch wel aan de top zaten wat dat betreft...
Ook al valt het tegen.... als je ergens anders geen baan kunt vinden wat dan? Ik was ook super zenuwachtig om naar Katherine te gaan, omdat het zo klein is etc. maar ik zag het als een springplank naar een andere baan eventueel ergens anders (en om eindelijk een Australische baan op m'n CV te hebben - helpt ook voor future banen) maar ik heb het hier zo naar m'n zin. Ik blijf nog wel even! Huren zijn erg hoog. Weinig value voor money. Als je alleen bent is het helemaal duur. $350/week voor een betonnen studio, slecht onderhouden, geen tuin etc. Voor echt een mooi huis betaal je toch wel $500/600 per week. Boodschappen zijn duur, benzine is duur. Maar ja, de salarissen liggen ook hoger. Het kan echt wel tegenvallen, maar het is maar wat je er zelf van maakt, en zie het als een opstapje naar iets beters!
 

Katjavdl

XPdite Sponsor
Wij zitten gelukkig in de goede hoek, wat werk betreft. Mijn hubby kan kiezen. 1 chef op 12 banen wordt er geroepen hier o_O
en voor 500 heb je in Sydney ook niet echt wat bijzonders hoor, brandstof zal duurder zijn; boodschappen wellicht ook iets. Maar voor de rest klinkt het zeker niet verkeerd. We wachten af tot in het nieuwe jaar, eerst het 1 en dan nieuw avontuur wellicht.
 


OFX
Top